How We Paid off $48,032 of Debt in 1 Year

How We Paid off $48,132 in Debt in One Year

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In May 2010, I married my dream girl. She was funny, beautiful and chock-full of 90’s TV trivia. Our first couple of dates consisted of a lot of Saved by the Bell and Seinfeld jokes.

Outside of knowing the Soup Nazi episode verbatim, Nicole and I both came into the marriage knowing the general basics of personal finance. You know, advice like:

  • “Don’t carry a credit card balance”
  • “Always have some savings for a rainy day”
  • “Good debt is okay to have”

In the years before our marriage, we did rack up a hefty amount of “good” debt. Car payments  and student loans were a few of the good debt offenders we carried into our marriage. Hey, you NEED a car to get around, right?! And how else are you going to pay for college?! 

After some research and soul-searching, we both realized that there is really no such thing as good debt or bad debt. It’s just debt. It’s all just money you owe someone. It won’t go away until you decide to clean it up.

We decided that being in debt was not something we wanted for our new family. We vowed to become debt-free (outside of our mortgage) before our first child was born.

In September of 2010, we owed $20,908 on my wife’s car and $27,124 on my student loans for a grand total of $48,032 of good/bad/indifferent debt. During the next 12 months, we took that $48,032 of debt, stuffed it in a piñata and repeatedly beat the living crap out of it (metaphorically speaking that is) …

By September 2011, we owed $0. Zilch. Nada. Bye-bye debt.

Here are the 5 steps we took to rid our family from debt forever:

1. Develop a Monthly Budget

We developed a monthly written budget that defined our way forward. We knew we had to reduce our expenses and increase our debt payments. The written budget guided us to ensure we would stay the course.

For budgeting, we used a simple spreadsheet. I’ve uploaded it to Google Drive so you can access it. 

As the years past, we decided to upgrade to Mint.com. This online budgeting tool gave us more flexibility and made the monthly budgeting process a lot quicker through Mint’s ability to link up to your bank and credit card accounts. I developed a simple guide below to get started on Mint.

Good ole fashioned pencil and paper will even do! Make sure you have a budget and stick to it.

2. Choose Your Debt Elimination Strategy

There are multiple debt elimination strategies to consider. Choose the one that works best for you and your situation.

Debt Snowball

How it works:

  • Take your debts and line them up from smallest amount owed to largest amount owed
  • Pay the smallest off first by making extra payments each month
  • Given that you’ll now have less interest to pay with one of your eliminated debts, take that extra amount of money and start paying down the principal on the next debt
  • The process continues with your payments growing larger like a snowball down a hill

Debt Snowball Example:

  • You have $2,000 in credit card debt, $500 in medical debt, $25,000 in a HELOC
  • Pay off the medical debt first, then the credit card, then the HELOC

Why the Debt Snowball works:

  • By getting some quick wins in paying off your smallest debt first, you’ll feel motivated to keep going!
  • If you started with the $25,000 HELOC, you could be at it for a quite a while and become uninspired to continue paying off your debt

Debt Avalanche

How it works?

  • Take your debts and line them up from largest interest rate to smallest interest rate
  • Pay off the debt with the largest interest rate first by making extra payments each month
  • The process continues similar to the debt snowball

Debt Avalanche Example:

  • Credit card debt (20% interest), medical debt (4% interest), HELOC (6%)
  • Pay off credit card debt first, then HELOC, then medical debt

Why the Debt Avalanche works:

  • Mathematically, this helps you pay off the most financially draining debts that you have and will (in theory) help you save the most money.

Other Debt Elimination Options

You can also look at using a Hybrid Model of these two approaches where you pay off the debt with the largest interest percentage first, and then get some quick wins on the debt with the smallest balance. Or simply just choose the debt that you HATE the most and smash that one first!

We chose the Debt Avalanche method because our student loan and car debts amounts were nearly similar. The student loan had an interest rate of 6.8% so we decided to blow that one up as soon as possible and then tackle the car loan.

3. Increase Your Income

Outside of spending less money, another great way to eliminate your debt fast is make more money!

Before we decided to go loco on our debt, I received a promotion to a sales position that allowed me to make commission when I brought in new business. At that time I was making around $70,000 per year without commissions. When Nicole and I decided to rid ourselves of our debt, let’s just say, I became highly motivated to sell … a lot.

I expanded our portfolio with a major client and doubled our business in 2011. Our business grew, my team grew and so did my commission checks. We did not adjust our lifestyle and buy new clothes, fancy dinners and jewelry. We took the extra money we received each month and slowly but surely paid down our debt using the Debt Avalanche. 

Now you may not be in a sales job like I was, but increasing your income is completely in your hands. It just takes extra effort.

How motivated are you to get rid of your debt?!  

Here are 10 ideas for increasing your income immediately. I’ve done 5 of these personally:

  1. Detail the value you bring to your company and ask for a salary increase
  2. Sell household items you don’t use anymore on Craigslist
  3. Become an Uber or Lyft driver in your downtime
  4. Airbnb a room at your house
  5. Get a roommate and charge monthly rent
  6. Use your skills to create something and sell it online (Etsy, etc).
  7. Help people with everyday tasks through services like Task Rabbit
  8. Become a freelance writer or start a blog
  9. Sell unused gift cards on eBay or Cardpool
  10. Start a weekend dog sitting service

4. Stick to the Plan

It is incredibly easy to stray away from your budget and your debt elimination strategy. There are always shiny objects that will distract you and take you off course.

Although I consider myself a frugal and disciplined guy, I had a tough time not spending the extra commission dollars I was receiving at my job. I’m human, right? To help me stay on track, my wife and I would remind ourselves that being debt-free before our first child came into the world would set our family on a course for financial success that would last our entire lives.

That reason for pushing hard (my “Why”) gave me the motivation to stick to the plan. I kept thinking how SATISFYING it would feel to rid ourselves completely of this debt.

5. Celebrate the Wins

We’re not robots. Live a little! When you pay off one of your debts, celebrate!! Go out to dinner. Pop some champagne. Share the news with family and friends. This is a BIG deal. You are NOT normal (in a good way)! This encouragement will motivate you to keep charging down the path toward complete financial freedom.

Nicole and I celebrated each debt crushing milestone together and it made our new marriage that much stronger. We were partnering together on something so important for our future and we were winning.

That year of debt destruction allowed us to have Nicole leave her job and stay home to raise our our kids. You can’t put a price tag on the bond she’s developed with Zoey and Calvin during the first years of their lives.

Fast forward to today, we’ve kept up our debt elimination plans and have our eyes laser focused on paying off the mortgage on our $400,000 dream house by the end of 2017. We only have $18,000 left to go! 

At this rate, we’re creating a financial future for our two children that we would never have imagined possible. And to think, it all started with taking that first step in making the conscious decision to eliminate our debt once and for all. Now we can have the freedom to live the lives we’ve always wanted.  


What does a debt-free life look like for you?


 

Author: Andy Hill

Andy Hill, a mid-30’s father of two living in the metro Detroit area, pens the MarriageKidsandMoney.com (MKM) blog taking you through the trials and tribulations of being a young parent and husband who is planning for his family’s future and winning with money.

2 thoughts on “How We Paid off $48,032 of Debt in 1 Year”

  1. Amazing accomplishments paying down your past and current debt! Do you have any advice about staying motivated to pay down such a large debt? I’m helping a family member with their finances and struggling to encourage them to keep going!

    1. Thank you!! To keep motivated with a larger amount of money (big student loans, mortgage, etc), you need to continuously remind yourself why you want to be debt free. Is it to change into a better career? Is it to have the ability to stay at home and raise your kids? Do you want to be able to vacation stress-free? Find your way through your “Why”.

      I would also highly recommend setting up milestone celebrations. For example, when my wife and I went below the $100,000 mark on our mortgage, we had a mini-celebration marking the big day.

      Also, sharing your progress and successes through a blog, in social forums like the Personal Finance section on Reddit or through your favorite social media forum will help stay motivated and encouraged as there are thousands of people JUST LIKE YOU out there working to make a big change in their lives.

      I hope that helps!!

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