How to Teach Young Kids About Money (And Why They’re Never too Young) – with Liz Frazier

Almost half of the US would not be able to cover a $400 emergency.

Around 40% have credit card debt. And 1/3 of Americans have saved $0 for retirement.

If we want our kids to survive these financial trip hazards and truly thrive, we need to start their financial education early. Our guest today, Liz Frazier, is a leader in the financial literacy movement and she’s helping parents teach their young children about money as soon as possible.

Liz is a fee-only certified financial planner and the author of Beyond Piggy Banks and Lemonade Stands, How to Teach Young Kids About Finance. She is a regular contributor for Forbes and has been featured in national media such as The Wall Street Journal, PBS, CNBC, ABC and Fox Radio. Liz lives in New York with her husband and two young kids.

We’ll be discussing how to get started with educating your kids about money, how to help children determine needs versus wants and how to encourage them to be grateful and appreciate what they have.

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Why I Stopped Pursuing FIRE and Early Retirement for a Happier Life Today – with Lisa Harrison

The FIRE movement (Financial Independence, Retire Early), has become a wildly popular concept over the last decade, but it’s also become wildly controversial.

Today, Andy talks with Lisa Harrison, the writer and podcast host behind Mad Money Monster. She’s had her story featured on major media outlets like Yahoo Finance, MarketWatch, and Forbes. She started off in love with the FIRE movement and idea of early retirement but then had a change of heart.

We’ll be diving into how she discovered FIRE, what changes she made to her lifestyle and what caused her to abandon the idea of early retirement altogether. 

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Why One-On-One Time with Kids is the Best Investment Parents Can Make – with Jim Sheils

As career-driven individuals and busy entrepreneurs, we can get often caught up in the time-consuming race of constantly growing our income and expanding our businesses.

While our motivations may be pure, there can be long term consequences to focusing more on your work than on your family.

Our guest today knows this reality first hand.

Jim Sheils is the founder of 18 Summers, which specializes in live events, workshops, and private consulting for organizations looking to strengthen their family lives while still succeeding in business. He’s an in-demand public speaker and owns a private real estate company that has done more than $200 million in transactions.

He’s also an avid surfer and enjoys traveling with his family and friends, especially his wife, Jamie, and their four children.

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How Having a Baby Changed My Financial Goals

Hello all! Andy Hill here …  We have a new guest post from Logan Allec from Money Done Right. Logan is a CPA, real estate investor, and full-time personal finance blogger. His article below shares how his life changed when he became a father. I can definitely relate! I hope you enjoy!

There’s no question that having a baby changed my life. I just wasn’t quite prepared for the impact it would have on my finances. 

I was definitely prepared for all the expenses of having a newborn. However, I also found myself adjusting my long-term financial goals in a way I hadn’t expected.

If you’re a new parent — or are about to become one — you might find yourself thinking about new financial goals that probably weren’t on your mind before. You might also realize you have a different mindset when it comes to money. 

Everyone’s experience is different, but here’s how the birth of my son changed my own financial goals.

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How Becoming a Parent Helped Me Retire at 41 – with Chris Mamula

There comes a point in a parent’s life when they want to own more of their time and spend it with the ones they love the most, but financially, it’s not always the easiest to accomplish.

Chris Mamula is my guest today. He faced this challenge when he became a new father and used his high savings rate and passion for his young family to achieve financial independence and retire at age 41.

Chris is the award-winning blogger behind Can I Retire Yet? A blog focused on helping others navigate financial independence and early retirement. He’s also the author of the new book, Choose FI: Your Blueprint to Financial Independence.

Joe Saul-Sehy, Chris Mamula and Andy Hill talking money, family and the pursuit of happiness… and board games too.
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How Fatherhood Sparked My Desire For Financial Independence

On one fine summer day in 2011, I was zipping around on my new moped headed to the local Rite Aid convenience store. I had an incredibly important purchase I was about to make.

After breezing through the sliding doors, I headed straight back to the pharmacy area. I was beaming. I was grinning ear-to-ear.

Given my excited state, the pharmacist probably thought I was a virgin looking to score my first Trojans. Nope. I was after something much more important.

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Why I Left My $400,000 Wall Street Salary After Having My Baby – with Chelsea Brennan

Life changes rapidly when you have a baby. One minute you’re crying with tears of joy and the next you’re crying because work, parenthood and life have suddenly become very complicated.

  • How do we keep living our current lifestyle now that we’re parents?
  • And how are we going to manage the costs of daycare, diapers and formula?
  • What if I want to stay at home instead of going back to work?

I’ve invited someone on the show today who faced a lot of these challenging questions as a young mother and now she’s helping other parents figure them out as well.

Chelsea Brennan is an ex-hedge fund investor, turned full-time blogger at Smart Money Mamas. After years of working on Wall Street. She made a major life change to choose family, passion, and a positive impact on the world over money.

Her story has been featured in major media outlets like Business Insider, Penny Hoarder and Forbes. Chelsea lives in Connecticut with her husband, two boys, a puppy named Stitches and 14 crazy chickens.

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Having “The Money Talk” with your Parents as they Get Older – with Cameron Huddleston

As our parents get older, their money problems can sometimes become our problems if we don’t plan ahead. And if we’re raising our children at the same time, there’s a reason they’re calling us the “sandwich generation”.

Today on the show, I have invited Cameron Huddleston to talk to us about how we can have that money talk with our parents and why we need to do it right away.

Cameron is the author of the new book, Mom and Dad, We Need to Talk: How to Have Essential Conversations with Your Parents About Their Finances. She’s also an award-winning personal finance journalist whose work has appeared in the Kiplinger’s Personal Finance, the Chicago Tribune, Yahoo Finance, and MSN.

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Why Young Parents Should Pay Off Their Mortgage Early – with Colin Murphy

How would you like to own your home outright?

What would it feel like to never make a mortgage payment ever again?

For our Mortgage Freedom series, we’re interviewing Colin Murphy who eliminated his mortgage in less than five years. Colin is a father, a husband, and a Chicago native. He’s going to let us peek inside and see how he made this monumental feat happen.

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I owe $200,000 in student loans. Where do I start?

Our question of the month comes from Joe from South Dakota:

Hey Andy,

Like you, I have a young family (wife + 2 young kids), a house, and a blessed life. However, I do have a mountain of student debt (~200,000) that I have accumulated through a doctorate in Chiropractic that creates considerable stress in our little world.

Continue reading “I owe $200,000 in student loans. Where do I start?”